Lola Kirke Wore A Really Powerful Accessory At The Golden Globes

Photo: Steve Granitz/WireImage.
Actress Lola Kirke decided to make a political statement at the Golden Globes last night via a subtle, simple, and generally badass accessory. She took the idea of using fashion as a form of armor to new (and quite chic) heights with an outfit addition that was small in scale but certainly impactful: The Mozart In The Jungle star wore a pale pink pin that read "Fuck Paul Ryan" to match her Andrew Gn gown. And it was awesome.

ICYMI, Speaker Paul Ryan has announced that, as part of efforts to defund Obamacare, Republicans are committed to defunding Planned Parenthood. This would thus eliminate or severely restrict access to abortion and other reproductive health care. Kirke joins us in the spirit of not having any of it, via her throwback accessory. (It's the type of pin you might've covered your backpack with circa middle school.)

"As a person with a platform, no matter what size it is, I think it's important to share your views and maybe elevate people that might agree with you, that maybe won't feel like they can have the same voice," Kirke told ELLE of her decision to wear the pin, which was created by her stylist and her stylist's son. "My body my choice, your body your choice."
Photo: Steve Granitz/WireImage.
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But Kirke's bold accessory wasn't the only politically-addled moment of this year's Golden Globes. (Surprisingly enough, though, we didn't see any safety pins as symbolic acts of solidarity on the red carpet last night.) Meryl Streep, who won the Cecil B. DeMille award last night, took a stance against president-elect Donald Trump in a speech that left everyone shook, yet inspired to push even harder for what's right. However, it's Kirke's revival of a nostalgic, on-trend fashion accessory that had us slow-clapping her red carpet getup last night and into this cold morning.

Kirke's finishing touch to her Golden Globes look is an excellent reminder that red carpet fashion can be more than mere frivolity or an act of pomp and circumstance for the rich and famous; it's a language. And Kirke's defiant act via one small accessory is proof that (along with the help of the media outlets Streep called upon in her speech) even something as miniscule as a pin can go a long way.
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