This State's U.S. Senate Race Is Going To Be Historic For An Amazing Reason

Loretta Sanchez Photo: Paul Archuleta/Getty Images.
Kamala Harris Photo: Anthony Harvey/Getty Images.
Hillary Clinton joined supporters in Brooklyn Tuesday night to celebrate becoming the first female presumptive presidential nominee for a major political party. But she wasn't the only woman in politics making history that night.

About 3,000 miles away, two more female politicians each became poised to break a major barrier.

California Attorney General Kamala Harris and Rep. Loretta Sanchez will face off in the November election for a U.S. Senate seat representing California. The two Democrats came in first and second in the Golden State's primary, which sends the top two finishers regardless of party affiliation to the general election.

Both are women of color and daughters of immigrants — which means a win for either would be monumental. There’s currently only one woman of color in the chamber: Mazie Hirono, an Asian-American senator representing Hawaii. And there has only been one Black female senator in the history of U.S. politics. A Latina has never held a U.S. Senate seat.

“Most of the time, I’m the only woman and the only minority in the room,” Harris told MSNBC on Friday.

The attorney general, daughter of Jamaican and Indian immigrants, has the endorsement of Emily’s List, a powerful donor network which aims to help elect Democratic women who support abortion rights. She won 40% of the votes during the primary, while Sanchez, a second-generation Mexican-American, trailed behind with only 18%. In total, 34 candidates competed in the race to replace retiring Sen. Barbara Boxer.

But as the general elections get closer, that lead may be reduced, according to The Huffington Post.

Another Latina aiming for a seat in the Senate is Catherine Cortez Masto, former state attorney general, who is representing Nevada. As a pro-choice Democratic candidate in a red-leaning state, Cortez Masto also has the support of Emily's List.

There's still five months to go before the general elections, but people all over the United States are already finding reason to rejoice, regardless of whom they support. History will definitely be made this fall.

More from US News

California passed a law Wednesday removing the state's 10-year statute of limitations for filing of child molestation and rape charges. Governor Jerry ...
Monday night was the personification of media bias and rigged politics
Election Day lasts just one day — a 24-hour culmination of the seemingly never-ending campaign season. But we’ll spend the next two, four, six years ...
If the chaotic party politics of the 2016 election have left you feeling completely birdbrained, this video is for you. The Founding Fathers (presented ...
If you had to describe the current political climate in America, what word would you choose: volatile, toxic, or divisive? Perhaps all of the above. ...
Hillary Clinton has been a role model for our generation for years, and now she’s laying out a master class in taking on workplace sexism
1. Major News: A bill to prevent the government from shutting down and to fund the fight against Zika was stalled in the Senate. With a 45-55 vote, the...
But take heart. There won’t be a President Trump. Not if I and millions of other women in this country have anything to say about it
A young girl delivered a powerful message of peace speaking at the first Charlotte City Council meeting since violence threatened to rip the city apart ...
Hillary Clinton long ago learned to let the insults roll off her back. And in doing so, she’s uncovered Trump's Achilles' heel
Donald Trump believes that climate change is a hoax. Sorry, Donald Trump does not believe that climate change is a hoax. Are you confused yet? I don't ...
Less than 12 hours after being criticized for calling out a former Miss Universe about her weight, Donald Trump is doubling down on his body-shaming ...
Watching the first presidential debate, I felt three things: terror, inspiration, and skepticism
"Wrong." "That makes me smart." "Why Not?" "Ugh." No, those aren't snippets of a conversation with a cranky 5-year-old. They're just a few of the ...