"Pink Visions" Celebrates Feminism & The Joys Of Hair Braiding

The next time you and your friends can’t decide what to do on girls night, consider frolicking in a Malibu canyon and braiding each other’s hair.

Dani Fine
’s music video for “Pink Visions” makes a strong case for the simple pleasures of womanly bonding. The dreamy haze of old film paired with the song’s delightfully positive vibes make it an unimposing feminist anthem. Sure, "pink = feminine" is a dated mode of gender-normativity, but in this context it’s just a stand-in for warmth, sweetness, intimacy, and body positivity.


“I was motivated to make art that expressed a message that literally poured out of my heart after watching Robert Altman's film, Three Women. I would definitely consider the video to be a feminist one, and a socially conscious one," says Fine. "My intention for the video shoot was to celebrate the interconnectedness of all beings, and putting that vision into the hands of all my closest girlfriends was an extremely empowering and moving experience.”

The video, co-starring fellow artists and friends Carson Lewellen, Yana Yatsuk, Olivia McClintock, Emma Cooper, Naomi Shon, Aram Bedrossian, and Jordan Wainer, was shot by videographer and editor Ethan DeLorenzo (who, as it happens, is the boyfriend of actress Jena Malone, “a dear and inspiring gem of a friend” of Dani’s.)

“We worked together as a whole and shared the roles of creative direction, choreography, styling, and hair braiding," Fine says. "We had a sleepover the night before shooting and watched Three Women and spent the following day shooting in Decker Canyon.”

When Fine isn’t frolicking with a group of girlfriends in scenic Malibu, she’s with her husband in Sydney, Australia, where the pair make music for children as The Little Waves Band. This collaborative spirit seems to touch all aspects of her work. “Pink Visions” is just the beginning, with plans to release an ongoing series of videos, songs, books, and art under the collaborative name Laughing Hearts Club in the works.

Says Fine: “I don't see anything I do as strictly coming from me, which is why working under a collective feels most right!”

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