Staying In(stant): Idris Elba's On The Case

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1lutherPhoto: Courtesy BBC.
Full disclosure: We love TV. So much so that sometimes we'd rather spend a whole weekend in front of the tube than dancing in da club. Is a lack of television service holding you back from feeling our joy? No problem! You can get by just fine on Netflix, Hulu, and the myriad other streaming services rapidly taking over the home-entertainment industry (thank you, Internet!).

Some shows are just better when binge-watched. Whether it's the latest BBC comedy, a PBS miniseries from the '70s, or just that cultish show prematurely scrubbed from a network, we're hooked on the stream. Staying In(stant) is your guide to the best of streaming content. Each week, we bring you a show we're obsessed with and think you'll love, too.


This Week: Luther, in which Stringer Bell gets on the other side of the law.

Where To Watch: Hulu, Netflix

How I Got Hooked: When a TV show is filmed in your neighborhood, you feel compelled to watch — even if said show makes you fear stepping outside, lest you be attacked by some blood-draining serial killer. Still, if some maniac is going to sneak into my house and steal my shoes, it'd be good to have DCI John Luther on the case. Rocking his signature long Paul Smith coat and Elba's native East London accent, Luther is a detective who doesn't always play by the rules, but still manages to wear his heart on his sleeve. He wants to be mates with his colleagues. He wants to get back together with his wife. He even strikes up a quasi-friendship with Ruth Wilson's Alice, despite the fact that it's plain to see she is (spoiler) a total psycho killer. It's impossible to not root for him.

Best Episode: If by "best" you mean "most terrifying," it's easily the first episode of season 3. If you are a single woman living alone, you should never, ever, ever, ever watch this. Ever. Although I did play it again for my friends so I could show them how scary it was.

Why You'll Love It: Sometimes you just need a good scare now and then. Elba is at the top of his acting game here, and his relationship with the patricidal Alice is as riveting to watch as it is befuddling. Luther isn't always squeaky-clean, but he can give a good sob, acts adorable when trying to ask a woman out, and looks really, really good in that coat. It's gritty drama at its best.