Pushing Daisies: The Charmingly Campy Show That Ended Way Too Soon

pushies-daisies-embedPhoto: Courtesy of ABC.
Full disclosure: We love TV. So much so that sometimes we'd rather spend a whole weekend in front of the tube than dancing at da club until 3 a.m. The lack of any kind of television service holding you back from feeling our joy? No problem! You can get by just fine on Netflix, Hulu, and the myriad other streaming services rapidly taking over the home entertainment industry (thank you, Internet!).
Advertisement
Some shows are just better when binge-watched. Whether it's the latest BBC comedy, a PBS miniseries from the '70s, or just that cultish show prematurely scrubbed from a network — we're hooked on the stream. So, we're unrolling Staying In(stant), a new feature highlighting the best of streaming content. Each week, we bring you a show we're obsessed with and think you should be, too.
This week? Pushing Daisies — the cult-followed dark comedy in which witty, hyperbolic dialogue and robust, blown-out visuals meet!
Where To Watch: TheWB.com, Amazon Prime
How I Got Hooked:
It was the 2009 Primetime Emmys. And, relatively unknown Kristin Chenoweth just beat out Amy Poehler and Kristen Wiig for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series — with a funny, moving, and daring speech, no less. You see, Girl used her stage time as an open call for prospective acting jobs. In fact, she may have won TV's most prestigious award for her role as heartbroken, chatty Olive Snook, but the world in which Olive existed — Pushing Daises — was no more. The show was canceled by then, partly due to the writers' strike, but Chenoweth's spirit stole my heart. I instantly put Pushing Daisies in my Netflix queue (it was available to stream at the time). And, the minute I watched Kristin deliver one of many long, convoluted monologues, I was hooked. Not gonna lie: The morbid subject matter, visual eye candy, and the handsome Lee Pace only helped to feed the addiction.
Best Episode:
Mostly every episode follows the same formula: Private-investigator-in-a-perpetually-bad-mood Emerson Cod brings a murder case to his partner/pie maker Ned (Pace). Ned, who has the ability to bring the dead back to life for one minute, questions the deceased victim. With new clues (because, apparently, dead people are chatty and never have enough time to identify their murderer), Emerson, Ned, his recently dead-but-alive-again childhood love, Chuck, and neurotic waitress Olive — a veritable Scooby gang — solve mysteries and find murderers. Imagine the glorious, magically induced hijinks that ensues! The amusing antics and sentimental message really shine in season one, episode eight, "Bitter Sweets." On top of the usual goodness, we're treated to a guest-star appearance by Molly Shannon, two murder cases, a pie versus candy shop "turf war," and a Lars And The Real Girl-type plot. In the end, we see the cold, hard realities of living in a dream world. But, this episode is at both times disturbingly sweet and uncomfortably honest, and I loved every moment of it.
Advertisement
Why You'll Love It:
Sure, murder, death, and other macabre motifs supply the storylines, but whatever darkness there is brilliantly juxtaposes against vibrant visuals, quirky characters, and the constant theme that true love transcends a lifetime. It's witty, creative, and more importantly, purposely cheesy. However, the dark humor appeals to both the realist and the dreamer. Full of double entendres, metaphors, puns, and rapid-speed dialogue that could rival the Gilmore Girls, this show was made for word geeks like me and in-the-closet and overt romantics everywhere. Unfortunately, this "forensic fairy tale" — even with all its super-fancy critical acclaim — ended way too soon. (The final season ended with a haphazard resolution since it got canceled.) Lucky for you, whether you're a dark, emo, suffer-in-silence type, or rainbows and butterflies are more your jam, you can spend your next weekend in on two seasons of dark, dreamy bliss.
Advertisement

More from Entertainment

Everything about Luke Cage communicates strength. The burly Harlem resident seems patient and unfeeling. Bullets can’t wound Luke Cage, and knives can’t ...
Try as we may to separate the man from his work, it feels disingenuous to write about a Woody Allen project without so much as mentioning the personal ...
We need to talk about Amanda Knox’s eyes. Knox is 29 now, nine years removed from “Foxy Knoxy," from her Italian study abroad trip, from that time she ...
It’s pretty obvious that movie and television characters don’t look the way most of us do, and that it's a problem. But rarely do we actually talk about ...
A major network has just ordered a series about a man who sends for a mail-order bride from the Philippines and winds up with a full mail-order family. ...
Now that James Lively is a big sib, we wanted to take a moment to celebrate the paragons of parenthood that are Blake Lively and Ryan Reynolds
Julianne Hough has responded to Amber Rose's accusations that the dancer body-shamed Rose on Dancing With the Stars. Hough told Entertainment Tonight that ...
(Paid Content) When a movie like Disney's Queen of Katwe comes out, you know award season is upon us. The inspiring new film has all the makings of an ...
We may not get to see live-action Beauty and The Beast until 2017, but we have been getting a ton of teasers lately. First, there was a trailer. Then, ...
It's official: Lady Gaga will be the 2017 Super Bowl halftime show headliner. The "Perfect Illusion" singer has confirmed in a tweet that, "This year the ...
In 1998, two young actors and best friends named Matt Damon and Ben Affleck took home the Oscar for Best Original Screenplay. The movie was Good Will ...
It has been but three years since Justin Theroux's bulge went for a jog in a pair of sweatpants, but it feels as if it happened only yesterday
Today, TMZ reported that Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie have come to a temporary divorce settlement that grants full custody of the six children to Jolie
Every once in a while, a show comes along that we're super psyched about — and not just like, "This is a cool series you should consider watching," but ...