Map: The States That Will Kill You

We recently showcased Moneychoice's map of the richest, poorest, and happiest states, and the infographic triggered plenty of lively discussion and debate. Well, brace yourselves: A far more morbid U.S. map is going viral. This time, we're looking at how each of the fifty states might harm — or even kill you.
Click around below to explore the regions that target your worst fears. For example, states like Illinois, Louisiana, North Carolina, and Michigan still have the highest murder rates in the country (which isn't terribly shocking, if you keep up with the news). But, Louisiana carries even more hidden perils, ranking among the worst in the nation when it comes to STDs, obesity, cancer deaths, and incarceration rates. (Also, in loss of teeth, randomly.) Louisiana is rich in cultural and culinary experiences, of course, but skittish types might want to jet elsewhere in light of such statistics. (But, a wise man once stated just how little he thought of living by numbers.)
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The map further examines morbidity in its many forms. If you harbor a secret phobia of getting struck by lightning, you might think twice before braving a storm in Florida, Texas, Colorado, or Georgia — all among the most likely places to be hit. You'd be safer in Alaska, Oregon, or Washington (then again, this happened last month). You'd also be statistically safer driving in Oregon than elsewhere in the country; it certainly registers far fewer car accidents than the traffic fatality leaders of Texas, Mississippi, Montana, and Alabama. In happier news, Utah, New Mexico, and Arizona suffer the least cancer deaths in the country (and there's a lot of debate about why that is).
How does New York fair overall? Not too terribly, actually, though we have a bit of a chlamydia problem. (Pause.) And, we also could use a boost in the mental health department, with only nine states faring worse psychologically, including Arkansas, California, and Illinois. But, that correlates with our previous map, which emphasized New Yorkers' ambitious, yet discontented lifestyles. You win some, you lose some.
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