Botox Parties Might Soon Be A Thing Of The Past — Here's Why

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The Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) has produced a new code of practice, and guess what? Botox parties are off the agenda. New guidelines say only fully qualified doctors with surgical training should carry out procedures on medical premises, so it's farewell to bubbly and canapés — unless you happen to have some medically-approved resuscitation equipment and other required paraphernalia knocking around your flat.
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The plan is to prevent a "relaxed" attitude to cosmetic treatments, and to ensure that who inject Botox or fillers are doctors, nurses, or, interestingly, dentists. So, you could end up with a filling and fillers next time you get your teeth checked out.
Buy-one-get-one-free and other financial deals and discounts are also banned under the new guidelines, the Independent reports. Doctors and surgeons are now advised to consider sending patients for assessment by a clinical psychologist before they give them any treatment. They'll also be required to ask patients about any eating disorders, and document any signs of Body Dysmorphic Disorder. Beyond that, the new code of practice also stops surgeons from promising patients that they will look like specific celebs after treatment. It adds that emotive words like "nicer" and "better" should be avoided and to opt instead for unambiguous words such as "smaller" when talking about the procedures. There should also be a cooling-off period of at least two weeks between the initial consultation and the procedure, the guidance adds.
There's been a lot of buzz around the unveiling of these new RCS guidelines and from our first scan we think that, regardless of which side of the fence you sit on when it comes to cosmetic surgery and injectables, they sound sensible and smart. If you're a Botox user, while it might be a drag that you can't get your injections done at home, at least you know you'll be getting the best possible care.
For the moment these will remain as guidelines and not the law of the land, but this new code of practise pre-empts a wider review about cosmetic surgery regulation by the NHS medical director, Sir Bruce Keogh.
What do you think? Do these guidelines go too far when it comes to controlling the cosmetic surgery industry— or are they long overdue?
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Photo: Courtesy of the Independent
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